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Do Brands Matter?

September 3, 2014 Leave a comment

What value is there in a brand? Do brands matter?

There have been a lot discussions of late questioning the value of brands. Personally, I think these have mostly come from people who don’t understand brands.

An article in The Economist recently raised this topic. Despite that research indicates brands account for more than 30% of the stockmarket value of companies of the S&P 500. Still, poo-poo the importance.

Has the Internet lowered brand values? Are brands just “shortcuts” for people to buy products. Or do some products really have more value based on their brand.

To learn more about the what many of today’s business pundits are saying, check out this article from The Economist.

http://www.economist.com/news/business/21614150-brands-are-most-valuable-assets-many-companies-possess-no-one-agrees-how-much-they

Categories: branding, Buzz Link, marketing

Do Clients and Customers Like Your Marketing?

When Sally Field won her Oscar back in 1988, she proclaimed, “You like me, you really like me.” It wasn’t an ego thing, it was a revelation. She was sincerely surprised to see acceptance of her work as an actress. And in doing so, she continued to develop as an actress, and arguably one of the more recognizable actresses of our time.

How does that apply to advertising and marketing? It applies very directly!

Several research studies in the past decade have shined new light on the importance of “likeability” of advertisements. In one study in 2005 by Hermie, Lanckriet, Lansloot and Peeters, it was determined that up to 80% of an ad’s memorability is tied to it’s likeability.

Think about that…if they like you, they are more apt to remember you…and if they remember you, at least you’ve got a shot at making a sale.

In related research, Sutherland and Sylvester conducted research that positively links likeability and persuasion.

What can we all do to make advertising more likeable, and thereby more persuasive and more memorable? Erik du Plessis, in his book The Advertised Mind,  postulates a model called the COMMAP, which identifies six areas that can affect likeability.

These areas that affect likeability include:

  • Entertainment
  • Empathy
  • Relevant News
  • Familiarity
  • Confusion
  • Alienatio

It is important to note that the first three, entertainment, empathy, and relevant news, are things that we should strive for. Familiarity (defined by du Plessis as being over-saturated in the market, confusion, and alienation, are three things that we should reduce

Do people like your ads? Maybe it’s time you asked the question, “Do people like us?” Your ads might have something to do with the answer.

12 Great Concepts From Malcolm Gladwell

 

 

 

Okay, so Malcolm is one of my heroes. He hassuch an incredible sense for looking at things in new and insightful ways. He had me at Tipping Point, but he just keeps coming up with the goods.

I just saw this article and it’s a great summary of some of his most powerful concepts.

Enjoy!

http://www.businessinsider.com/12-mind-blowing-concepts-from-malcolm-gladwells-bestsellers-2011-8#

Categories: Buzz Link, marketing

Listen To Brian Hemsworth Talk Marketing On Stars of PR Radio

Rakowitz-show

Brian Hemsworth, marketing professional and author of this blog will be interviewed by Cindy Rakowitz Thursday on the Stars of PR radio show. They’ll be discussing Southern California Professional Magazine, marketing, and a whole bunch of related topics.

Cindy is the CEO of Blackman Rakowitz Public Relations, and is  a highly respected, award- winning executive with years of experience in crisis management, branding and marketing. Rakowitz contributes as an expert analyst to several news organizations. She is the co-author of the new book Emergency Public Relations, Crisis Management in a 3.0 World and is currently enjoying her speaking tour.

The show is broadcast live at 7:00 am Pacific Time on VoiceAmerica internet radio. Click here for more info: http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/971/stars-of-pr.

Why Advertising Has A Brand Problem

I am convinced of it—advertising has a brand problem.

Discussion after discussion, meeting after meeting, experience after experience, it keeps coming back to me: advertising is losing the war.

With big agencies, and big accounts, and big budgets, the word ‘advertising’ is still okay. But in small to mid-sized business, saying ‘advertising’ in conversation makes you sound like you’re completely out of touch with today.

The CEOs, managing partners, and presidents of today’s businesses and organizations don’t like advertising. It’s been drilled into their heads that it doesn’t work, or at least a big part of it doesn’t. That can be argued, but that’s for another blog post.

What can’t be argued (well) is that our terms have changed. Today’s executive is much more interested in ‘marketing’. Now the classic definition puts advertising as one activity under the marketing umbrella, but that’s beside the point. That’s not how corporate America is using the term.

Marketing is now loosely defined as everything to promote your product or service EXCEPT advertising. It’s about social media, personal selling, networking, PR, sales promotion, trade promotion, events, and ‘engagement’. It’s not about advertising.

The C-suite has been misguided, I will give you that. In the push for ‘accountability’ in marketing and advertising expenditures, traditional advertising has been pushed aside by the Internet for its incredible measurements and metrics. With the web, we know who is visiting our sites and opening our emails. When know when the did it, for how long, and where they clicked. And if a purchase action occurred, we can point our finger right to the action and know how, where and why.

Tradition advertising doesn’t offer those luxuries. It’s much harder to track—not impossible, but harder. CEOs want numbers…or better put, CFOs are pushing CEOs to want numbers.

Here’s the catch: just because its harder to measure doesn’t mean it isn’t working.

To add to the challenges of advertising accountability, we now have to worry about the perception of the whole concept.

Since the economic downturn of 2008, my students at Pepperdine University have learned that it is far easier to get ‘marketing’ jobs than ‘advertising’ jobs. And that, my friends, is a classic brand problem.

Advertising and branding luminaries Stuart and Bob Sanders years ago drilled into my head that branding problems are not always (or even often) from real circumstances. They are from perceptions. And the good news is those perceptions can be altered.

So I challenge you marketing folk to watch your use of the terms of this profession, and measure the results on the faces of your clients. If you’re like me, you’ll find yourself talking more about ‘integrated marketing’ efforts, and less about ‘advertising campaigns.’

New Social Network for Live Events

Crowdseye screen grab

Hey everyone, here’s a cool new social media platform that focuses on live events. It’s in beta right now, but you can be one of the testers. It’s free, just go to Crowdseye.com and sign in.

They just had a really successful test at SXSW, and are planning on the big launch for Coachella. When you post pics, video or comments, you’re entered into Crowdseye.com challenges, and you can win stuff.

Check it out, and let me know what you think.

Lessons From The Netflix Debacle

Forbes screen clip

Here’s a great read on just how Netflex screwed the pooch and 5 lessons learned from the mess. In an internet world using social media, marketing successes AND failures can happen lightning fast.

Interested in the specifics? Read it online at Forbeshttp://www.forbes.com/sites/theyec/2011/12/28/5-business-lessons-from-the-netflix-pricing-debacle/.